ARTHURDESH – Sat Feb 28 8pm SHARP, $8-up, all ages, Bushwick, capacity is 375 so arrive early

arthurdeshscreenprint

The story ch. xiii presents

ARTHURDESH
benefit for arthur magazine, independently curated by michael curtis hilde and produced by todd p.

MV & EE
Peter Stampfel (Holy Modal Rounders) and the Ether Frolic Mob
Dr Ragtime & Pals (Jack Rose Band)
Jana Hunter & TJO
quad (Helen Rush, PG Six, Samara Lubelski, Bob Bannister)
Sharon Van Etten
Mountainhood
Headdress
White Hills

Readings by Louise Landis Levi, Byron Coley and Gary Panter, Wesley Eisold and Max Morton, Angela Jaeger, and Robbie Snyderman

Visuals by Flying Andes

Saturday, February 28, 2009
8pm
$8-30 sliding scale | all ages
Market Hotel
1142 Myrtle Ave
Bushwick, Brooklyn
11221

curator michael curtis hilde .:. readings curator byron coley
.:. production toddpnyc.com .:.

Poster by Arik Roper

Continue reading

ARTHURDESH – Sat Feb 28 2009 8pm SHARP, $8-up, all ages, Bushwick, capacity is 375 so arrive early

arthurdeshscreenprint

The story ch. xiii presents

ARTHURDESH
benefit for arthur magazine, independently curated by michael curtis hilde and produced by todd p.

MV & EE
Peter Stampfel (Holy Modal Rounders) and the Ether Frolic Mob
Dr Ragtime & Pals (Jack Rose Band)
Jana Hunter & TJO
quad (Helen Rush, PG Six, Samara Lubelski, Bob Bannister)
Sharon Van Etten
Mountainhood
Headdress
White Hills

Readings by Louise Landis Levi, Byron Coley and Gary Panter, Wesley Eisold and Max Morton, Angela Jaeger, and Robbie Snyderman

Visuals by Flying Andes

Saturday, February 28, 2009
8pm
$8-30 sliding scale | all ages
Market Hotel
1142 Myrtle Ave
Bushwick, Brooklyn
11221

curator michael curtis hilde .:. readings curator byron coley
.:. production toddpnyc.com .:.

Poster by Arik Roper

Continue reading

“Pre-industrial revolution tactics with food"

We need more of this, everywhere, as soon as possible: artisans making high-quality goods for barter and sale in local economies, and teaching what they know in hands-on workshops.

From The New York Times – February 25, 2009

Brooklyn’s New Culinary Movement
By OLIVER SCHWANER-ALBRIGHT

TO get the slightly battered convection oven for their new Brooklyn chocolate factory, Rick and Michael Mast traded 250 chocolate bars.

The chocolate is as good as legal tender for Andrew Tarlow and Mark Firth, owners of Marlow & Sons, the restaurant and specialty shop that bartered away the oven. “We can’t keep it in stock,” Mr. Tarlow said. “It sells better than anything else.”

About two years ago the Masts were trading truffles for beers at a local bar. Now Mast Brothers Chocolate has a national following as one of the few producers in the country, and the only one in the city, to make chocolate by hand from cacao beans they’ve roasted, in that oven. These days, with a kitchen and a bit of ambition, you can start to make a name for yourself in Brooklyn. The borough has become an incubator for a culinary-minded generation whose idea of fun is learning how to make something delicious and finding a way to sell it.
Continue reading

Philip José Farmer, 1918-2009

pjf9.jpg

Science fiction pioneer Philip José Farmer died today. Farmer was the man who introduced sex to sf with his first published story, ‘The Lovers’, in 1953. Decades before The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen there was the Wold Newton Universe. Hugely prolific, he was one of the few authors capable of writing Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan in the style of William Burroughs (‘Jungle Rot Kid on the Nod’). Audacity and intelligence are always in short supply; he’ll be missed.

Ottoman Empirical Evidence: the Beginning of Recording in the Years of Decline

ottoman_map1 hedjaztaxim

From the beginning of the 14th century through the following five hundred years, the Ottoman Empire spread from Anatolia north through the Balkans, east through Persia, south through Arabia and west across nearly the entire North Coast of Africa, expanding across just slightly less land than the Roman Empire at its peak. After collapsing slowly through the 19th century and early 20th century, the Treaty of Lausanne in 1923 dissolved the last of the Empire and formalized the successor state of Turkey. The cultural and political fallout of five centuries of Turkish administrative and cultural domination over the Eastern Mediterranean lands will continue through generations still to come.

Coincident with the waning years of the Ottoman Empire was the birth of the sound recording industry, and thousands of recordings were made of the music of the Turks and the ethnic minorities that they governed within the Ottoman territories. Two juicy websites offer substantial collections of the sounds of the musical art of the Turks and Arabs before the radical cultural shifts of the early and mid-20th century (and two decades before the invention of the microphone!), all gratis.

Twenty-two stunning recordings made in Constantinople and Cairo ca. 1906-07 are available for download here:
Archeophone.org Collection of Turkish and Arabic Zonophone Discs
And twenty-one cylinder recordings made ca. 1900 (!) of Turkish and Arabic music are available here:
University of California, Santa Barbara Collection of Middle-Eastern Cyliders

To top it all off, there is plenty of the great master Cemil Bey to be had on the internet, but this flabbergasting fiddle performance from the 10s on YouTube is absolutely not to be missed. (I have no explaination for the groaning, atonal, gestural passages which bear stunning resemblance to “radical” developments in mid- and late-20th century jazz and Western classical music, although I’d be grateful for any information on this piece that anyone can offer.)
Tanburi Cemil Bey – Janik Nini

America's War Against Leaves losing support

Nate Silver at FiveThirtyEight crunches the polling figures:

We all know that Michael Phelps was on something. But perhaps he was also onto something. Three recent polls show that Americans are more sympathetic to the idea of legalizing marijuana than ever before.

The first poll, conducted last week by Rasmussen Reports, has 40 percent of Americans in support of legalizing the drug and 46 percent opposed. The second, conducted in January by CBS News, has 41 percent in favor of legalization and 52 percent against. And a third poll, conducted by Zogby on behalf of the marijuana-rights advocacy group NORML, has 44 percent of Americans in support of legalized pot and 52 percent opposed.

That all three polls show support for legalization passing through the 40 percent barrier may be significant. I compiled a database of every past poll I could find on this subject, including a series of Gallup polls and results from the General Social Survey, and could never before find more than 36 percent of the population (Gallup in October, 2005) stating a position in favor of legalization. (More.)

And speaking of Michael Phelps, how’s this for a business headline? Dumping Phelps Over Bong Rip Damages Kellogg’s Brand Reputation.

Out of the 5,600 company reputations Vanno monitors, Kellogg ranked ninth before it booted Phelps. Now it’s ranked 83. Not even an industry-wide peanut scare inflicted as much damage on the food company’s reputation. (More.)