A Poem from Beth Woodcome

Hometown
by Beth Woodcome

The shame in the church crawls out of each human. A mild sin grows first behind the ears.

The wind: it comes without thought or any use of my hands. My hair grows the same color as the red scarf covering a lamp. I’ve heard of women who lead men into a chamber that is stained like the pit of a cherry. Place something upon the tongue. Go in peace.

Pretending there is no time to stop and look at the old gravestones that lean south, my father keeps driving. The common is cold and blown clear of leaves. This is near Chocksett School playground where a German shepherd tore up my soft back. My father took me to the dog that night to let it smell me. I held it in my arms. We’re all bound to something.

The strain of the body in trauma stresses the heart muscle. When I come up for air, the wind fills my throat before I realize I want it to.

When I think of what I am, I think of this small town. The dog, my back, the women, my dog.

Jodorowsky & Moebius' masterpiece THE INCAL returns to print this November.

Moebius is arguably my favorite comics creator of all time.  For the past few years, zero of his books have been in print in the US.  Zero.

The good news is Humanoids is back and they’re bringing all of the Jodorowsky/Moebius collaborations back to print.  Jodorowsky and Moebius worked together to create a film adaptation of Dune in 1974.  The film was never made, but instead of letting all their designs and ideas go to waste, they took those concepts and made some awesome comics like Metabarons and The Incal.  This November their finest collaboration, THE INCAL, returns with all three volumes collected in a deluxe slipcase format (with the original colors, not those terrible digital recolors from a few years ago).

Humanoids just received a sample copy of the book and there’s more great photos of the interiors on their blog.

RUSHKOFF: Why I Left My Publisher in Order to Publish a Book

Why I Left My Publisher in Order to Publish a Book
by Douglas Rushkoff

I’m getting more questions about my latest book than about any other I’ve written. And this is before the book is even out—before anyone has even read the galleys.

That’s because the questions aren’t about what I wrote, but about how I ended up publishing it: with an independent publisher, for very little money, and through a distribution model that makes it available on only one website. Could I be doing this of sound mind and my own volition? Why would a bestselling author, capable of garnering a six-figure advance on a book, forgo the money, the media, and the mojo associated with a big publishing house?

Because it would make my book twice as expensive for you, half as profitable for me, less purposefully written, and unavailable until about two years from now. In short, the traditional publishing system is nearly dead. And publishing a book under its rules can mean the death of ideas within it, as well. Until it utterly reworks its method, gets rid of a majority of its corporate dead weight, releases its publishing houses from the conglomerates that own them, and embraces direct selling models, the publishing industry will remain rather useless to readers and writers alike.

Authors and readers no longer need Big Publishing to find and engage one another. The sooner we all realize this, the better off we’ll all be.

Think of it from the author’s perspective. Continue reading

The Yellow Bittern, the Life and Times of Liam Clancy

THE YELLOW BITTERN, a new feature documentary from Alan Gilsenan, is an intimate, confessional yet highly cinematic film charts the remarkable rise to fame of the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem from their small-town beginnings in County Tipperary in Ireland to the folk hey-day of Greenwich Village in the Sixties where they absorbed black musical influences and out-sold the Beatles. But these devil-may-care Irish actors (as they were then) were, in turn, to influence a host of artists from Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger to The Pogues.  But this darkly revealing portrait also goes behind the mask of the performer and delves into the psyche of Liam Clancy and his troubled personal life where the excesses of rock-and-roll found their way in to the world of folk.

Find out more at liamclancyfilm.com/