The Yellow Bittern, the Life and Times of Liam Clancy

THE YELLOW BITTERN, a new feature documentary from Alan Gilsenan, is an intimate, confessional yet highly cinematic film charts the remarkable rise to fame of the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem from their small-town beginnings in County Tipperary in Ireland to the folk hey-day of Greenwich Village in the Sixties where they absorbed black musical influences and out-sold the Beatles. But these devil-may-care Irish actors (as they were then) were, in turn, to influence a host of artists from Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger to The Pogues.  But this darkly revealing portrait also goes behind the mask of the performer and delves into the psyche of Liam Clancy and his troubled personal life where the excesses of rock-and-roll found their way in to the world of folk.

Find out more at liamclancyfilm.com/

Floating World Animation Fest presents: DMTV – Oct. 13 at Holocene, PDX

(poster by Drew Marshall)

Floating World Animation Fest returns with a new name and trippier mission. We’ve dug even deeper into the vaults of psychedelic animation to curate a heroic dose of visionary video art for this year’s animation fest.

For our fourth annual animation fest it was time to focus on what we liked best from previous shows and continue to seek out films that really embrace the infinite mysteries that resonate with us. The result is DMTV, a program that goes further into experimental realms of video art and abstract visuals.

Rounding out the evening are two of my favorite local bands, Atole and Nice Nice who will perform with live visuals mixed by e*Rock and Yoshi Sodeoka.

LISTING INFORMATION:

WHO: Atole, Nice Nice; films by: Barry Doupe, Michael Robinson, James Mercer, Eurico Coelho, Jacob Ciocci, Milton Croissant, David O’Reilly, Dash Shaw, Dalibor Baric, Kihachiro Kawamoto, Max Hattler, Jesus Rivera, Max Capacity and more!

WHAT: FWC’s 4th annual animation fest & live music by Atole, Nice Nice

WHEN: Wednesday, October 13th, 8pm – 1am

WHERE: Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison St.

COST: $7 at door, $5 advance tickets at Floating World, 21+

DMTV trailer – Floating World Animation Fest, Holocene, Oct. 13th 2010 from Floating World Comics on Vimeo.

Highlights of this year’s program include:

Travel, aka The Trip (1973) – Kihachiro Kawamoto studied puppet animation in Prague in 1963 before going on to create his own haunting puppet and cut-out animations drawing from his own Japanese heritage. Travel depicts the journey of a young girl into the Dali-esque landscape of her own psyche.

Apeiron (1996) – Eurico Coelho depicts a modern technological labyrinth where society has surrendered to the cold lamps of their computer screens. The entirety of this ten minute film was animated on a Commodore Amiga 4000, giving the film a completely fresh aesthetic that has outlived the technology with which it was created.

The Peace Tape (2008) – With a title hearkening back to the analog era, The Peace Tape is a frenetic remix of old and new “found” video. Culling his sources from thrift stores (countless straight-to-VHS childrens’ programs), the Internet (a single YouTube clip featuring “dog in a dog costume”), and his own designs (flash animation of eyes and mouths, subliminal flickers of text), Ciocci concentrates hours of light entertainment into a dense, four-minute block. Saved from total sensory overload by the musical logic of Extreme Animals’ “A Better Way,” The Peace Tape is cryptic, hypnotic (and above all), empathetic. “Culture is out of control,” Ciocci explains, “but it is ok.”

Whose Toes (2009) – Barry Doupé’s films are as surreal as any Lynch or Jodorowsky movie, but with an added level of weirdness because they are rendered with Sims-like polygon graphics. Showcasing the late Princess Diana and JFK as its main characters, we are invited to return to past events that have caused discomfort, and to re-imagine a misstep in time.

The Unclothed Man in the 35th Century A.D (2009) – This original animated web series is based on graphic novelist and comic book artist Dash Shaw’s latest book of the same title. Shaw’s animation has been widely praised for its eclectic style, innovative design and emotional depth.

Sept. 28 Autonomedia Jubilee Saint – VICTOR JARA


SEPTEMBER 28 —VICTOR JARA
Chilean song-writer, activist, martyr of Pinochet coup.
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qXkXTaZiXg&feature=related

SEPTEMBER 28 HOLIDAYS AND FESTIVALS
Jewish: YOM KIPPUR. Old China: CONFUCIUS DAY.
Egypt: FEAST OF KHEPERA, the Beetle God.
Huichol, Mexico: FESTIVAL OF WAWATSARI, God of Deer Peyote.

ALSO ON SEPTEMBER 28 IN HISTORY…
551 BC — Chinese sage Confucius born.
1573 — Painter of Italian street life Caravaggio born, Milan, Italy.
1820 — Marxist Comrade Friedrich Engels born, Barmen, Rhine, Prussia.
1864 — First Communist International formed, London, England.
1891 — American novelist Herman Melville dies, New York City.
1938 — Chilean folksinger Victor Jara born, Lonquen, Chile.
1966 — French surrealist André Breton dies, Paris, France.
1978 — Pope John Paul I dies suspiciously after only 34 days in office.

DIY Magic: towards a Jungian model of the Supernatural, part one

Towards a Jungian Model of the Supernatural, part one

Let’s talk about paranormal activity. I want to take a look at some well documented phenomena, ranging from UFOs and Bigfoot to Ghosts and fairy tales; the idea here is to look for commonalities. We are going to take a very brief survey of the history of the paranormal this month, and pay attention to the common threads. From this I hope to weave a tapestry using Jungian psychology as a working model from which to consider the occult. My idea is that within the proper framework, many of these seemingly different kinds of phenomena are actually different facets or paradigms of the same thing.

There is an old fable that goes something like this: three blind men encounter something in the jungle, and they are trying to figure out what it is. The first man goes up to it and feels its legs, which are huge, and he says, “Well, what we have here are a couple of really big trees.” The second blind dude feels the tail of the large creature and proclaims, “You’re crazy, what we have here is a simple paint brush.” The third blind man reaches out and, touching the nose of the creature, declares, “Both of you must be loco! Even a blind man could tell you this is a boa constrictor.”

I would like to suggest that part of why the accounts of the paranormal appear so mysterious (and as we shall see baffling to the point of appearing silly) is because when considered just on their own, for example a specific account of Bigfoot or a UFO encounter, often smacks of  strange, whimsical, and ridiculous details. Continue reading