TONIGHT Thurs Jan 3, 6-10pm Portland, Ore.: ARTHUR RE-LAUNCH PARTY at Floating World Comics

arthurmini

Arthur No. 33: Buckminster approves.

ARTHUR RE-LAUNCH PARTY TONIGHT IN PORTLAND, OREGON

Come celebrate the release of Arthur’s first new issue in four years at a free party TONIGHT Thursday, January 3, 2013 at Floating World Comics, Arthur’s new co-publisher.

We’ll have original comic art on display from contributors Rick Veitch and Gabby Schulz. Floating World head honcho/Arthur co-publisher Jason Leivian will be there, and Arthur Art Director Yasmin Khan is rumored to be stopping by. Plus: Betel nuts, and other surprises.

WHO: Arthur No. 33
WHAT: Magazine release party and art exhibit
WHEN: Thursday, January 3, 6-10pm
WHERE: Floating World Comics, 400 NW Couch St., Portland, Ore. (503)241-0227

If you can’t make it, order a copy online—$5, pretty cheap. Info here.

What humans are saying about Arthur No. 33…

“The new oversized print-only issue of Arthur Magazine is even more gorgeous and satisfying than expected. Like a Sunday supplement for heads.” — Jesse Jarnow, author of Big Day Coming: Yo La Tengo and the Rise of Indie Rock

“Beautiful” — Chris Richards, The Washington Post

“The Haydukes of music/art/culture journalism return…welcome back!” — Team Love Records

“A coffee-table newspaper, printed on 16 immense pages of newsprint with minimal ads, and almost every inch covered with words or pictures… The cover, a gigantic piece by surreal comics artist Rick Veitch, is gorgeous, and the crispness and clarity of the print is perhaps the best I’ve seen in a newspaper. Everything in the new [issue] is worth absorbing… Opening the mammoth pages of the new Arthur feels much like unfolding a road map, one that points to strange, unfamiliar worlds.” — Ned Lannamann, The Portland Mercury

Photo of Buckminster via Brooke S!

Washington Post on Arthur’s return to life

Arthur magazine, a counterculture favorite, returns to print

By Chris Richards

December 25, 2012

When the aughties weren’t horrifying, they were tough. Wars raged, SARS spiked, economies crumbled and America decided that its pop singers would be elected to fame via reality television, which, while pseudo-democratic, remains humiliating for all parties involved.

We needed a friend. Someone who could tell a weird joke, hip us to unheard music, teach us how to forage for food in the wild, or give us crash courses in magic. We needed Arthur.

A decade ago, free stacks of the counterculture magazine began materializing at coffee shops, bookstores, nightclubs and galleries across the country. These unsuspecting little newspapers were packed with fantastic reads — articles for, by and/or about rockers, radicals, astrologists, herbalists, poets, punks, believers, debunkers, cooks, comedians, cartoonists and Dolly Parton. But in 2008, as the great recession sent so many indie publications into death spasms, the magazine went kaput.

Four years later, Arthur has risen. “It’s good to be alive again, doing something that we love,” writes editor and co-publisher Jay Babcock in the magazine’s new issue, which features a definitive interview with late outsider guitarist Jack Rose and an almost hallucinogenic appreciation of Waylon Jennings’s finest album, “Dreaming My Dreams,” by Stewart Voegtlin.

And then there’s the biggest surprise: You can actually hold this thing — a beautiful, 16-page broadsheet — in your hands…

Continue reading: Washington Post

THE SOURCE by Charles Potts

The Source

Vertical integration in the United States once meant
White people on top and everybody else layered in below.

It has come to mean control of a product and its profits
From conception to consumption
Employing all the formerly middle men
Into one sleek unit of production and delivery.

In the case of poetry I’ve done that:
Dreamed of a poem
Captured the poem in the dream
Reduced it to representational linguistic fragments illustrated on paper
Bound it with other plausible reductions
Into the pages of a book
With barcodes, prices, photographs, and blurbs
On the back cover and covered it with the art of friends
To be sold if not in open markets
Then at the Walla Walla farmers market for years.

Does this make me then a farmer of dreams?
I decline to bring any more dreams
Thru the trap door of commerce
From which they so turbulently spring.
Retired dream farmer in a collapsed poetry market.

The poems and the dreams to which they are inextricably attached
Remain hidden in the dream verse
One of many multi verses I am told.

Charles Potts

WHAT WE COULD HAVE AGAIN

othernyc

“In Thierry Cohen’s series, Darkened Cities, we think we see bright night skies over cities. Actually, what we’re seeing is the opposite. These are the skies that we don’t see. By traveling to places free from light pollution but situated on precisely the same latitude, [Cohen] obtains skies identical to the very ones visible above the [too-bright] cities a few hours earlier or later. He shows, in other words, not a fantasy sky as it might be dreamt, but a real one as it should be seen…”

http://thierrycohen.com/pages/texts/text.html

(Link via Ann Magnuson)