Some new summertime nature vibes from Ventura, California

SETH PETTERSEN: sethpettersen.blogspot.com

WHEN: Friday, July 2, 8-10pm
WHERE: Grady’s Record Refuge, 2546 E. Main St., Ventura, 805-648-5565
WHAT: Seth Pettersen and Modest Fur

***FREE concert this Friday with Seth Pettersen and Modest Fur (from LA). The show will run from 8-10pm and the store will of course be open before, during, and after the gig. Hope to see you there!

Short film on Grady’s Record Refuge

Thurs June 24, Joshua Tree, CA: Arthur presents LEXIE MOUNTAIN BOYS at Starlite Courtyard (free, outdoors, all-ages)

Arthur Magazine and Mt. Fuji General Store present

LEXIE MOUNTAIN BOYS

Thursday June 24
8:30pm
at the Starlite Courtyard
outside Mt. Fuji General Store
61740C 29 Palms Hwy
Joshua Tree, California
760-333-9174

Free * All ages welcome

Hot off a tour as handpicked openers for Matmos, Baltimore’s experimental all-female a capella performance mob Lexie Mountain Boys make their High Desert debut TONIGHT outdoors in the Starlite Courtyard in downtown Joshua Tree, California in a FREE FREE FREE, pass-the-hat event. All ages are welcome. No two Lexie Mountain Boys performances are alike so please arrive on-time and be appropriately prepared to witness one of the most notorious acts to come out of Baltimore’s internationally renowned underground arts scene.

The Lexies have performed as St Augustine’s Tower (London), The New Museum (NY), The Rohsska Museet (Gothenberg SE), The Baltimore Museum of Art, and more. Their full-length CD “Sacred Vacation” was recorded in a Baltimore church by Wye Oak’s Andy Stack, and released on Carpark Records, also home to Dan Deacon & Animal Collective.

Lexie herself is also a member of the Crazy Dreams Band.

More Lexie Mountain Boys:
myspace
Facebook

BLACK FLAG: A 12-Step Program in Self-Reliance

A 12-Step Program in Self-Reliance
How L.A.’s hardcore pioneers BLACK FLAG made it through their early years

by Jay Babcock

Originally published in the June 28, 2001 LAWeekly

By midsummer 1981, when the then-unknown, now-notorious Henry Rollins joined Black Flag as its fourth singer, the South Bay–based punk band had already tasted some extremely hard-earned success. Despite a set of severe hurdles — from an initial difficulty in getting local club gigs and a record deal to sensational “punk violence!” coverage by the news media and constant harassment of both the band and its fans by police — Black Flag had managed to self-release three EPs, tour North America several times, and grow from playing to a couple of dozen people at a San Fernando Valley coffeehouse to headlining shows at the Santa Monica Civic and Olympic Auditorium.

Black Flag accomplished this by developing a do-it-yourself work and business ethic which, although common in jazz, rhythm & blues and folk circles for decades, was almost unique for American rock bands at the time. It was an ethic that was hugely effective, and one that would prove hugely influential over the next two decades.

But what’s ironic about the band’s current historical status as one of American punk rock’s original DIY pioneers — “They may well be the band that made the biggest difference,” says no less an authority than Fugazi’s Ian MacKaye — is that Black Flag’s original aspirations had nothing to do with building an alternate model to the existing music industry.

“The beginning and end of it was always working on the music,” says Black Flag founder, guitarist and chief songwriter Greg Ginn today. “The other stuff was very much at the periphery.”

As they tell it now, Ginn & Co. would have been quite content to let someone else handle the mundane trivialities of being recording artists and performers: the nuts and bolts of producing and releasing records, doing publicity and marketing, booking tours, handling legal matters, lugging equipment, etc. Black Flag would play while others would work. But the music industry, broadly speaking, wasn’t interested in Black Flag—so Black Flag had to figure out, almost on their own, how to get their music heard. This is how they did it, in their own words:

Continue reading

TONIGHT, Tue June 15, L.A.: Arthur proudly presents WOODSIST Festival L.A. – ALL AGES

Arthur proudly presents

Woodsist Festival L.A.
June 15, 2010
The Echo & Echoplex

enter at 1154 Glendale Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90026
6pm / $10 advance, $12 day of show / ALL AGES

featuring

REAL ESTATE

WOODS
(listen: “I Was Gone”, “Party in the Pines”)

KURT VILE
(listen: “Freeway in Mind”)

ABE VIGODA

THE ART MUSEUMS

THE MANTLES

NODZZZ

SUN ARAW

ALL SAINTS DAY
Gregg Foreman (Cat Power / Delta 72) and Katy Goodman (Vivian Girls)

THE BATHS

Purchase tickets for $10 here thru Ticketweb

Updates: woodsist.blogspot.com


More about WOODS and their new album, from David Keenan (The Wire, Volcanic Tongue): Continue reading

ALL-AGES DIALOGUES, Part V: Will Oldham—"I think the best thing we can probably do would be to make fake IDs more available"

bpb
photo by Valgeir Sigurðsson

The ALL-AGES Dialogues: A conversation with Will Oldham
by Jay Babcock

This interview was conducted by phone in late summer 2006, as part of a series of conversations I was doing with various folks regarding the history of all-ages, philosophy/ethic of all-ages, the state of play of all-ages, yadda yadda. Shoulda been published long ago but stuff kept going awry and we didn’t get it in the mag. Still, almost four years later, it’s a good, pertinent read. Thanks to Will for his time and patience, and special thanks to a certain friend of Arthur who transcribed this conversation a long time ago.

Will Oldham, as Bonnie “Prince” Billy, is traveling and playing shows right now with the Cairo Gang. More info: dragcity.com

Previously in this series:
Interview with John Sinclair (MC5 manager, activist, poet-historian)
Interview with Chuck Dukowski (Black Flag, Chuck Dukowski Sextet)
Interview with Calvin Johnson (K Records, Beat Happening, Dub Narcotic Sound System)
Interview with Greg Saunier (Deerhoof)


Arthur: Do you prefer to play all-ages shows? Is it a priority for you, or does it even matter?

Will Oldham: It matters and it makes a difference, but it isn’t a ‘priority.’ Does that make sense? Every show is contextualized for what it is—in that way, it’s important. But I guess my skewed stance is that I’ve always approached this work of making music in terms of… I think my main drive is to write and record music, so playing live is always just a weird experiment. So to me, every aspect of playing live is part of that weird experiment, whereas a lot of bands and musicians seem to make records of the music that they make. [For me] it’s the reverse. I think that every time that you play live, it’s like, ‘Whoa! What was that all about?’ It’s great whoever the audience is. You try to find the most fun audience, I guess.

Arthur: I noticed that when you are touring shortly, you’re playing a bunch of record stores…

Yeah, an all record-store tour.

Arthur: One of the weird things, from what I can tell about the performance environment in America, is that one of the few places where people of all ages can see quality music in a live setting now is the record store.

Yeah. “Quality music.” One thing that I had started to think about before we started on this topic was… like, how old are you?

Arthur: 35.

I’m 36, and my sense is that, if you won’t take offense, is that we are out of touch. There are quality shows going on six out of seven nights a week that are all-ages shows, in people’s houses, in public places, and we just don’t know those bands. Because I’ve seen some this year—I’ve seen some every year. And it’s like, Whoa, where’d these kids come from? And these kids came from the same places we came from, and they’re making great music that we don’t have access to, because… It’s the same way that bands that I went to see play 20 years ago, people who were 22, to 36, to 50, they would be saying ‘There’s just no music going on these days. There’s no shows like I remember.’ And meanwhile, I was having the fucking time of my life! Continue reading