November 23rd – Film screening of Sandy Bull doc in Greenpoint, BROOKLYN


A documentary screening slash musical showcase in commemoration of the legendary banjo-pickin’, oud-playing folk guitarist Sandy Bull. This lineup will surely satiate the soul of any wayfaring traveler…

Documentary screenings
Oma (16mm short) portrait of Daphne Hellman (Sandy Bull’s mom)
Sandy Bull: No Deposit, No Return Blues (45 min)

Live musical performances
Colin Langenus Acoustic Guitar Orchestra
D Charles Speer
Ramble Tamble

Free admission!

Monday, November 23rd, 8:30pm
18 Java St. / Greenpoint, Brooklyn 11222
(View map.)

September 12th, 15th and 22nd – Light Industry presents…


Above: Stills from the documentary Taiga by Ulrike Ottinger


Above: Still from Apocalypto Now by Jonathan Horowitz

Light Industry presents a series of films and lectures ranging from an eight-hour documentary by Ulrike Ottinger which follows reindeer nomads as they migrate across Mongolia (Taiga), to a screening of a mock-50s disaster movie that artist Jonathan Horowitz made entirely from found documentary and TV footage (Apocalypto Now), to a lecture by film critic Ed Halter on a small film company whose inspiring low-budget documentaries explore “Sasquatch, the Loch Ness Monster, the Bermuda Triangle, life after death, UFOs” and the possibility that “extraterrestrial travelers came to earth in prehistoric times to teach technology to our ancestors and create civilization.”

220 36th Street, 5th Floor / Brooklyn, New York 11232
$7 at door

See below for show times:

Taiga
Ulrike Ottinger, 16mm, 1991/2, 501 mins
Presented by Ginger Brooks Takahashi
Saturday, September 12, 2009 at 1:00pm

“Taiga is Ulrike Ottinger’s eight-hour documentary film on life in Northern Mongolia, a journey to the yak and reindeer nomads. For this presentation at Light Industry, we will watch the film in its entirety. Food will be served, but please also bring things to share. Attempts and interpretations of the region’s cuisine are encouraged–yak butter and various ferments? English translations of the transcript will be provided to the audience to read along.

Next year, I will travel to the Mongolian wild steppe with an entourage of women tracing the tracks of Ottinger’s journey in Johanna D’Arc of Monglia. This screening will be an introduction to the trip.” – GBT
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A mountain is a living thing

The National Film Board of Canada was founded in 1939 in part as a way to distribute World War II propaganda throughout the Great White North, but went on to become a bastion for experimental animation, “socially relevant documentaries” and other film projects “which provoke discussion and debate on subjects of interest to Canadian audiences and foreign markets.” In particular the NFB is known for producing some of the dreamiest nature documentaries of modern times — it’s where Boards of Canada got their name and a lot of their soft-focus naturalist vibes. And now the NFB has started posting their library of films online.

A lot of these docs are wordless montages of natural imagery accompanied by droning Eno/Tangerine Dream-style synthesizer soundtracks — our favorite so far is William Canning’s 26-minute short Temples of Time (1971), described by the NFB as follows:

A mountain is a living thing; it has an ecological balance, a process of evolution manifested in slow, subtle ways; but it is also subject to the ravages of human intervention. Filmed in the Canadian Rockies and in Garibaldi Park, this picture brings to the screen magnificent footage of mountain solitudes and the wildlife found there, of natural splendor in all its changing moods. The film carries the implicit warning that all this may pass away if people do not seek to preserve it.

Hook your computer up to your stereo for the full effect of Edward Kalehoff’s warbling synth drone soundtrack. Who needs to figure out the whole new digital TV upgrade chip whatever thing when we’ve got this treasure trove to explore? More to come …

Note: The NFB’s online library is brand new and still a little wonky from time to time. If the embedded Temples of Time isn’t working for you, go here to watch it on the NFB site.