TONIGHT Sun Aug 29 NYC 7pm: Arthur presents SANDY BULL documentary at Anthology, with director present

8.28.10: JUST ADDED: Guitarist Steve Gunn will perform a 30-minute electric set with John Truscinski on drums following the screening.

Anthology Film Archives and Arthur Magazine present

Sunday, Aug 29
7:00 PM

NO DEPOSIT, NO RETURN BLUES & OMA
by KC Bull
ca. 65 minutes.

NO DEPOSIT, NO RETURN BLUES (
2004/09, 55 minutes, video)
A cult hero revered in folk circles and beyond for his incredible ability to play seemingly any stringed instrument, Sandy Bull’s virtuosity was only matched by his technological curiosity and inclination towards experimentation, both in the studio and onstage. Often compared to contemporaries such as John Fahey and Robbie Basho, Bull’s music merges influences from the worlds of jazz, classical, Arabic, and Indian composition, yet always retains an immediately distinctive feel that comes across as both effortless and timeless. NO DEPOSIT, NO RETURN BLUES shines a light on Bull’s unconventional life, bringing forward many unknown stories, interviews with friends and admirers (Wavy Gravy, Hamza El Din, Bob Neuwirth), as well as long unheard recordings from different periods in his career. If you know Bull’s music you’ll want to see this film, and if his name is new to you then it will serve as the ultimate introduction.

Screening with:
OMA (2001, 10 minutes, 16mm-to-video)
by KC Bull
A short portrait about KC’s grandmother (Sandy’s mom) Daphne Hellman. Daphne was a harpist in NYC who played everything from Bach to boogie woogie. The portrait traces Daphne’s life through stories of her career playing harp and of her several marriages to New York socialites. The film includes footage of Daphne and her long-time musical partner, Mr. Spoons, performing in the Subway.

Anthology Film Archives
32 Second Avenue
New York, NY 10003
(212) 505-5181

$9 General Admission
$8 Essential Cinema (free for members)
$7 Students, seniors and children (12 & under)
$6 AFA Members

Tickets are available at Anthology’s box office on the day of the show only. The box office opens 30 minutes before the first show of the day. There are no advance ticket sales. Reservations are available to Anthology members only.

"Blurred + Spacey": Brightblack Morning Light's Nabob Shineywater on SANDY BULL (Oct. 2006)

Originally published in Arthur No. 25 (October 2006)

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Blurred and Spacey
By Nabob Shineywater

Sandy Bull
Still Valentine’s Day 1969: Live at the Matrix, San Francisco
(Water)

When I was living in Point Reyes, my closest friends became people in their sixties. They would share stories with me as I managed the community print shop. One day I was listening to Sandy Bull, and a visiting Vietnam vet shared a great story with me. One day back in the late ’60s he was riding his bicycle through Mill Valley when he heard very, very loud music. He was able to locate the house it was coming from, and sat on the porch and listened for about three hours. Then the music stopped and he knocked on the door to thank the artist. Two very tall African women opened the door, traditionally dressed and very gorgeous. Then Sandy appeared, and was friendly, but also severely spacey. The house was empty with white walls and carpet. My friend was already familiar with Sandy’s music, and had attended some of the shows in San Francisco that Sandy was doing. He rode away on his bicycle, surprised and happy.

Sandy lived in Berkeley, Mill Valley and Fairfax in the ’60s and his best friend was Hamza El Din, the oudist from Egypt. What a special time these men had together. Hamza had arrived in the United States after opening for the Grateful Dead at the Pyramids. He is best known for his ’70s release Escalay (translated as “The Water Wheel”), which features Sandy playing an ancient beat on an ancient drum. In Escalay, Hamza wanted to translate the feelings of the folks whose role it was to haul water to and from the well. It’s the best cinematic folk music I’ve heard—when you listen to it alone you actually arrive at his homeland. The oud is the most gut-pounding stringed instrument I’ve heard: it sends out depthful waves, resonations that have bass where you wouldn’t expect it.

Still Valentine’s Day 1969: Live at the Matrix, San Francisco is a live album from 1969, and the result of Sandy pushing the limits by using an electric oud through about four different Fender amps, all with heavy reverb and vibrato. I really enjoy the entire collection of songs, and have spent some high times with them lately. The songs feel a little more blurry and druggy than on E Pluribus Unum, the 1968 studio album where a lot of them first appeared. Which I appreciate: I am getting stoned a lot, so I am currently looking for items to reflect that, that I respect. Yet I know he was into the junkier side of drug experimentations. I feel if the tapes were mixed track-by track, that it could expose some more low-end that might be now missing. Sandy had a degree in classical bass; he was highly skilled, and his bass lines are sometimes just as interesting as his oud.

Sandy’s shows are another discussion, but briefly, he wouldn’t play with anyone. So he recorded all the instrumentation on analog tape, and then figured a way to synch up each tape machine. He would then haul this to a gig, press play on everything, then rotate between electric oud and pedal steel. Sandy bootlegs are amazing and even funny, as he was so interesting—Sandy had a great style and it is rumored that William Burroughs saw Sandy and immediately copied his fashion; the Beatles song “Come Together” is actually about Sandy; etc. Anyway, Sandy told obscure funny stories between songs. This release has a small dialogue about the live sound engineer ; the un-mastered version I have actually has a huge wallop of stage feedback due to the lack of understanding by the evening’s sound engineer of just what Sandy was attempting in relation to amplified reverb. The feedback is a painful-sounding slash across the speakers, not interesting at all, and isn’t approved of by Sandy. The same thing regularly happens today in live performance—this realm has not progressed much, and the truth of it is that it’s the fault of people’s stagnant exchange with audio psychedelia. There’s been a lack of progression or maybe a lack of respect for the trade of sound engineering folk.

If you get to know the songs you can actually feel Sandy become elated with tonality as he plays here. Some may think his jams are light, or even beatnik. I think his jams are of the heaviest order, and I believe him to be Northern California’s greatest artist ever because he wasn’t a contrived enterprise. This music is a reflection of what was the norm in NorCal back then. People were learning about the strength of folk culture around the world, and using that knowledge to justify dropping out … and to drop out in colorful, musical ways.

November 23rd – Film screening of Sandy Bull doc in Greenpoint, BROOKLYN


A documentary screening slash musical showcase in commemoration of the legendary banjo-pickin’, oud-playing folk guitarist Sandy Bull. This lineup will surely satiate the soul of any wayfaring traveler…

Documentary screenings
Oma (16mm short) portrait of Daphne Hellman (Sandy Bull’s mom)
Sandy Bull: No Deposit, No Return Blues (45 min)

Live musical performances
Colin Langenus Acoustic Guitar Orchestra
D Charles Speer
Ramble Tamble

Free admission!

Monday, November 23rd, 8:30pm
18 Java St. / Greenpoint, Brooklyn 11222
(View map.)

Tonight 8pm, free: SANDY BULL doc screening at Glasslands in Brooklyn

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The filmmaker— K.C. Bull, Sandy’s daughter— will be in attendance.

From the Glasslands site:

Monday July 6th 8:00pm FREE

Sandy Bull: No Deposit, No Return Blues

“Deposit No Return Blues” is a documentary K.C. Bull made about her father, psychadelic rock legend Sandy Bull. He played the role of the outsider, writing meditations on his instrument and bringing classical music to the cosmic happening. He was many things, but the way the film remembers him is through his instrument and how it connected him to the outside world.

In the early sixties, before such six-string heroes as Ry Cooder, Leo Kottke and Richard Thompson impressed with their ability to hop among and fuse musical genres, Sandy Bull glided from classical and jazz to ethnic music and rock & roll with grace and verve. Incorporating elements of folk, jazz and Indian and Arabic-influenced dronish modes, Bull’s ethereal, psychedelic folk-rock recordings , which looked beyond American roots music for its inspiration, and performances made him a cult-hero to a generation of musicians and adventurous audiences. In 2001 Bull died of lung cancer, but not before his daughter began to fashion a personal portrait of a gifted musician and moving ode to a father and daughter relationship. The film is KC Bull’s understated way of saying, “Have you heard of my dad? No? Oh, you should.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bull
Sandy Bull on myspace

Music:
P.G. Six: http://www.myspace.com/pgsixband
and Angkor What?