Arthur Radio Transmission #27 w/ AMI DANG

Hailing from Baltimore, MD, a bubbling pot that continues to churn out a rainbow fog swirl of new and exciting bands (Crazy Dreams Band, Lower Dens) as well as experimental music and new media festivals (Whartscape, Transmodern), Ami Dang seems to exude the creative energy that is pouring out of her hometown. Her upcoming full-length album (due out in December on Ehse Records), was crafted from an intersecting background of classical sitar and composition, experimental electronics and visual performance, combined with a deep love for ’90s dance beats and a fuzzy memory of megaphones blaring Indian pop songs into the streets of New Delhi.

If you’re in the area next week, catch Ami performing along with many other artists at Baltimore’s High Zero festival on September 23rd and 24th, 2010.


Photo of Ami Dang by Bad Brilliance/Andrew Strasser

STREAMING: [audio:http://www.arthurmag.com/magpie/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Arthur-Radio-27-w_-AMI-DANG-8-1-2010.mp3%5D

DOWNLOAD: Arthur Radio Transmission #27 w/ Ami Dang 8-1-2010

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MIRA BILLOTTE: "A secret diagram of the Universe"

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KOSMOS: MUSIC OF THE SPHERES

AN INSTALLATION BY MIRA BILLOTTE
AUGUST 21st – SEPTEMBER 4TH
THE CREATIVE ALLIANCE AT THE PATTERSON
3134 EASTERN AVENUE, BALTIMORE, MD
WWW.CREATIVEALLIANCE.ORG • 410.276.1651

Artist and musician Mira Billotte (White Magic), focuses on the harmony of the divine ratio between ourselves and the Kosmos. The installation transforms into an environment of spiritual exaltation, a place of ritual, a temple of commune with the Kosmos, bringing forth an ancient instinct, theurgy; the ritual practice of uniting with the divine.

As within us there is a microcosm, so created in this space, a microcosm of the divine macrocosm; sand, sand paintings, Mandalas, fabrics, elements, incense, projections, altar objects, plants, other organic materials and esoteric symbols create a secret diagram of the Universe.

Closing Ceremony
Friday September 4 • 8PM • 10$, 8$ For Members
WHITE MAGIC w/ Zomes (Asa Osbourne from Lungfish) and Daniel Higgs

Led by the haunting vocals of songwriter Mira Billotte, with Sleepy Doug Shaw on guitar, NYC based (and Baltimore connected) White Magic was formed in 2003 and has toured with the likes of Animal Collective, Sonic Youth and Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, and has released two EPs and one full length album on the Drag City label, among other limited releases. The band covered “As I Went Out One Morning” for Todd Haynes’ recent Dylan film, as well as appearing on Hal Wilner’s “Rogue’s Gallery” compilation last year. Tonight Billotte offers new spectral sounds, complete with visuals and full regalia, celebrating the close of her mystical exhibition in the Main Gallery. Zomes (with Asa Osbourne from Lungfish) and Daniel Higgs open. Doors @ 8pm. Show @ 9pm. $10. All ages. $8 mbrs, stus.

myspace.com/whitemagicmusic

Tuesday evening new music: CELEBRATION "OPEN YOUR HEART"

“Video tarot card for Judgement created by the Baltimore band Celebration for their experimental self released free music art magic ritual website: celebrationelectrictarot.com

“The Judgement card is about rebirth, resurrection. The idea of Judgement day is that the dead rise, their sins are forgiven, and they move onto heaven. The Judgement card is similar, it asks for the resurrection to summon the past, forgive it, and let it go. There are wounds from the past that we never let heal, sins we’ve committed that we refuse to forgive, bad habits we haven’t the courage to lose. Judgement advises us to finally face these, recognize that the past is past, and put them to rest, absolutely and irrevocably. This is also a card of healing, quite literally from an accident or illness, as well as a card signaling great transformation, renewal, change.”

April 10th at Floristree in Baltimore, MD


Extra Golden will be playing one of the first shows of their U.S. tour with Audrey Chen, Matthew Papich (of Ecstatic Sunshine) and Ami Dang. Alongside Extra Golden’s Kenyan sunshine pop, be prepared for some throat singing, warbling, wailing, psychedelic sitar/electronics and blissed out washes of guitar…

Date & Time: Friday, April 10th, 8:30pm
Venue: Floristree
Location: 405 W. Franklin / Baltimore, MD 21201
Price: $5 before 9:30, $10 after (Get there early!)

DAN DEACON on his new tent, his new album and his new live show

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Dan Deacon at the controls (“photo by Zardoz, as interpreted by James Petz“)


A NEW STAGE
Experimental pop musician/joybringer Dan Deacon on his new tent, his new album and his new live approach
by Jay Babcock

(April 3, 2009)

From Dan Deacon’s page on the Wham City site:

“Hi. I’m Dan Deacon. Before moving to Baltimore I went to college and grad school at the Conservatory of Music at SUNY Purchase. For the past four years I have been touring a collection of pieces for voice, electronics and audience. In my spare time I enjoying booking shows at various weird places in Baltimore. I’m looking forward to touring less and finishing up a series of pieces for large ensemble. The future surrounds us. Let us begin.”

Dan Deacon has just begun his North American tour following the release of his second album. Released last week by the essential Carpark record label, Bromst an ebullient, anthemic, densely stacked minimalist rave monster recorded with “real” instruments, including a player piano. Bromst is bonkers in the best way: I hear Eno vocals, Koyaanisqatsi-era Philip Glass, Terry Riley, gamelan, Spike Jones, vintage video games, put-your-hand-in-the-air-and-knock-on-that-door techno, organized surges, simple chord progressions embedded in layers of drums and piano notes. (Stream Bromst songs at dan deacon myspace.)

Bromst is a unique album made by a uniquely multi-gifted artist: a class clown from music composition class, a populist intellectual with a fiercely whimsical streak, a serious composer who can elevate an on-the-edge-of-danger dance party into mass communion through charisma, imaginative group gameplaying and a certain fearlessness. If you haven’t witnessed Deacon live, check out the two youtubes included in the text below; in one, audience members sing from sheet music in a basement party; in the second…well, to write about it would be to reduce it. Goosebumps, baby! I’m not sure if I’ve ever seen a performing artist so adept in creating group public joy without pandering—or one whose abilities, interests and ethic are so perfectly attuned to what the times call for.

There’s a lot more to say about what Deacon is up to, and why it’s so vital and inspiring. (A good place to start is this extremely perceptive thinkpiece by Rjyan Kidwell; also check out C & D’s interview in Arthur No. 27 with Deacon and director Jimmy Joe Roche about their “Ultimate Reality” film, available here.) I wanna wait to get my thoughts together on all of this til next week, though, cuz this weekend I am venturing for the first time to psychedelic Baltimore to see Deacon and his new 14-piece ensemble perform Saturday night as part of the 6th Annual Transmodern Festival.

But there’s no reason not to post the following conversation now, conducted by phone at 11am on consecutive days in February from two secret locations in Philadelphia’s Fishtown neighborhood (thanks Geoff, thanks Jack). Dan was waking up in Baltimore. The first day, midway through an answer to my second question, he confided, “I’m having a weird allergic reaction. The whole right side of my body is swelled up and I can’t open my eye all the way.” But I thought he was talking perfect sense and he was up for it, so we kept on rolling. The following is a condensation from those two conversations; any mistakes in transcription are mine, and will be corrected…

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Arthur: That’s a great, evocative album cover. How did you come up with it?

Dan Deacon: I was camping with my dad this summer and one morning I woke up early, because you tend to wake up early when you’re camping, and the light was coming through the tent and it just looked really nice. I started thinking about tents, as a structure, as a place in which to live, and being a very old, old thing. I thought, I’d love to make a tent, an old fancy European-looking tent that you’d see in a movie like Lord of the Rings, where they have that kind of encampment set-up and some of them are just shitty tents, shantytowns, and then there’s the beautiful one. I realized I knew nothing about making a tent, I know nothing about construction, or sewing, so I designed it on paper first, then started to build it. It became this nightmarish project, but I’m really glad I did it. It’s 10 foot x 10 foot x 10 foot, it’s a hexagon-shaped tent, so it’s ten feet between opposite points of the hexagon, then ten feet straight up. I also wanted something [for the album cover] that could exist in reality, so if I used it in the live show, the audience could have some sort of connectivity to it, which a lot of what the record is about—about interconnectivity and feeling attached to things that otherwise feel abstract or you have no attachment for.

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April 5th – ALTERED STATES Exhibition at Transmodern Festival in Baltimore, MD

ALTERED STATES Exhibition

LOF/T Load of Fun Theatre
120 W. North Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21201

Tickets: $5 (tix can be purchased at the door)
Doors Open: 8pm, Performances: 9pm

ALTERED STATES, Curated by Jamillah James for Frontier Projects

Live Performances by Lexie Mountain Boys, Soft Circle (ex-Black Dice/Lightning Bolt), Blues Control (Siltbreeze Records, Brooklyn), Ra Khuit Noor, and New Jedi Order.

Altered States examines the history of collective action, originating in the 1960s with communalism (made families in hippie and freak subcultures), and avant-garde performance, where elements were borrowed from traditional rituals and ceremonial spectacle. This rubric for performance and artistic practice champions a freedom from creative, economic, and social constraints, and de-emphasizes the singular, commodifiable art object as the end-all of cultural production.

The exhibition considers a renewed interest in the aesthetics and performativity of mysticism. Through idiosyncratic performance, borrowed iconography, and the creation of “invested” objects and spaces, the artists in Altered States re-contextualize alterity, or “otherness”, as a psychedelic state of being, and explore the secular, the sacred, and the creative space in between.
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